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The Student News Site of Gulliver Preparatory

The Raider Voice

The Student News Site of Gulliver Preparatory

The Raider Voice

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Fall Out Boy’s Wintour Lives Up to its Name

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It was truly the perfect way to enjoy a Friday night. A concert filled with both classic and new songs, with a lively young crowd, and with the spectacular vocal range and talent of a talented and timeless band.

When I went to see Fall Out Boy perform at the Hard Rock Casino Feb. 26, I was fulfilling a dream that I’ve held since middle school. I’d always loved the unique voice of lovable Patrick Stump, the unabashed appeal of black-haired and eyeliner-adorned bassist Pete Wentz, the goofy and spectacular figure of Joe Trohman, and the eternally shirtless tattooed drummer Andy Hurley. Their personalities shone throughout their performance, though they’ve certainly matured from their younger rebellious stage.

The concert began with spectacular performances from PVRIS and Awolnation, who performed their hit song “Sail”. When Fall Out Boy made their much-anticipated entrance, it appeared as though snow was falling spectacularly from the ceiling. Technically, it was not snow but rather foam, though it looked quite convincing under the blue and white lights of the stage.

The effects were consistently fantastic throughout the show, ranging from black and white streamers to giant balls of flame. The most visually spectacular part of the show came during the encore when they sang “My Songs Know What You Did in the Dark”. With each rendition of the chorus, large flames shot from the back of the stage in time with the music. I could feel the heat from the fire from my seat.

Fall Out Boy is a long-standing band, with music spanning from the early 2000s to now. They had a comfortable, diverse score with songs ranging from “Dance, Dance” to “The Kids Aren’t Alright”. I would have loved to hear some of their more classic songs like “What a Catch, Donnie” which tend to have wittier lyrics and younger, simpler themes. These songs reflect a former time of awkward teenage angst and of punk bands all hating the government for unspecified reasons.

With the remarkable visuals and vocals, fans were certainly sad to leave. After the lights faded and silence fell, leaving that unmistakable ringing in one’s ears, there was a tangible resistance to leaving. Even after one encore, the show seemed short because it was so fantastic. However, the crowd of millennials and now-adults eventually left, but only after a round of boisterous applause that shook the venue.

 

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