Presidential hopefuls worked to make lasting impressions in recent debates

Talia Pfeffer

Republican presidential candidates Ben Carson, left, and Donald Trump during the GOP debate at the Reagan Library in Simi Valley, Calif., on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015. (Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times/TNS)
Republican presidential candidates Ben Carson, left, and Donald Trump during the GOP debate at the Reagan Library in Simi Valley, Calif., on Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015. (Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times/TNS)

With the primaries quickly approaching, many tuned in to watch both the Republican debates and the Democratic debate, to formulate opinions on which hopeful would best fit the position of Commander In Chief in 2016.
Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton, and  Republican candidate Carly Fiorina, could be considered the winners of their respective debates, making it a possibility that 2016 will be the year when a woman will lead the country.  If the U.S. chooses a female President in the next election, it will be the first time in history that a woman will assume the role.  This could make a difference when discussing women’s issues, and the purpose and future of Planned Parenthood from a national perspective.
In the secondary GOP debate, Fiorina made it clear that she was against Planned Parenthood, and was disturbed by the PP abortion videos she claimed to have watched.
“They [Republicans] don’t mind having big government to interfere with a woman’s right to choose and to try to take down Planned Parenthood. They’re fine with big government when it comes to that,” said Clinton, a big supporter of the agency.
Another issue discussed in the debates was foreign policy. Clinton defended her role in engineering a “reset” of relations with Russia while Secretary of State and said things had changed only when Vladimir Putin returned to the presidency. She said the United States must stand up to Putin’s “bullying” and must take “more of a leadership position” to help end the bloody civil war in Syria.
Her Democratic opponent, Bernie Sanders slammed the war as a “quagmire in a quagmire” and argued that it was triggered by the war in Iraq; referencing Clinton’s 2002 decision as a New York senator to authorize the war in Iraq.

Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton on the debate stage on Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015, in Las Vegas. (Brian Cahn/Zuma Press/TNS)
Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton on the debate stage on Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015, in Las Vegas. (Brian Cahn/Zuma Press/TNS)

In the GOP debate, It was established early on that each of the candidates have a negative view on the Iran Deal, but Kentucky Senator Rand Paul had the unique perspective that it would be absurd to tear up the agreement like all of the other candidates vowed to do on their first day in office. In addition, Jeb was the first candidate in the debate who acknowledged his strong support and connection for Israel, which led to a discussion about reconnecting ties with Israel.
The Republican front-runner, Donald Trump, criticized Hillary Clinton from the beginning but on Oct. 13 he told ABC News that she was the definite winner of the Democratic debate. According to the Republican candidates, Clinton’s email scandal was something that made her a non-trustworthy person, who should not be in charge of making nationwide decisions.
The debates served to bring the candidates’ stand on issues to the spotlight as both parties prepare to make their final nominations.